Sunday, February 26, 2012

Quote of the Day

”Never half-ass two things, whole-ass one thing.”
- Ron Swanson

Vietnam.


A Taste of Vietnam from Daniel Klein on Vimeo.

Happiness


Friday, February 24, 2012

What would happen if kids weren't properly educated on the facts.


Read more @ http://www.treehugger.com/environmental-policy/if-heartland-gets-its-way-what-your-kids-will-learn-about-climate-science-school-video.html

Quote of the day.

Physical or worldly happiness has to be continually "drunk" or "eaten" to sustain it. But really these actions should be done only to stop or allay hunger whenever we feel its pangs. As for spiritual or Dhammic happiness, no drinking or eating is required to bring it about.

What the heck is a book?


High-speed rail in the U.S. Just think about the possibilities.

Plans progressing for high-speed rail to Chicago
Imagine hopping on a train in downtown Minneapolis and getting off less than six hours later in the heart of Chicago, with a stop in Milwaukee in between.


Thursday, February 23, 2012

Unreal


The Mountain from TSO Photography on Vimeo.

Explore


The Wild Heart - A Journey through the Southwest Wilderness from Henry Jun Wah Lee on Vimeo.

Yep


Quote of the day.

Physical happiness is not that hard to come by, but spiritual happiness is difficult to attain. Physical happiness is easy to see and know, but spiritual happiness is more elusive. Still, there are few people who accept these truths, because they believe that when the physical body is happy, the mind automatically becomes happy, too - and they are convinced that there is no other happiness to be found elsewhere.

Monday, February 20, 2012

Wise words from a wise man. (Joshua Foss)


I was trying my best not to force a path, rather let it present itself in front of me so long as I provided the motivation to keep moving forward. Over the years, I began to understand that this expansion was not unique to myself or any other individual, but was quite clearly culturally driven and evolutionary in its nature. Looking at the overarching human story, we too have been expanding our perspectives through both social and political evolution, but at much slower paces. Starting a couple hundred thousand of years ago, we roamed the lands as hunters and gatherers and were very much driven by survival. We’ve since evolved through many socio-political phases, from warring tribalism, to feudal kindgoms, and now into democratic multiethnic nation states. Throughout all of these phases or worldviews, one can distinguish a trend in our collective ability to gain perspective and be more empathic. Looking back, we can see this applied in a near infinite number of ways. The European Enlightenment for example explored the values of equality, freedom and rules of law, helping to birth modern democracy. More recently, our cultural evolution has championed the new ideals of civil rights, women’s rights, the rights of ethnic minorities, and, later, gay rights. And as this trend of inclusion and broadening perspective continues (as it naturally will), it will evolve to better incorporate the rights of things that are currently voiceless… in particular the rights of nature and biodiversity, and the rights of future generations.
Read more @ joshuafoss.com/greenrevolution/

Sunday, February 19, 2012

The real deal.

Plastic-eating fungus discovered in Amazonian rainforest

It's been filling landfills for the past 150 years -- used in everything from Tupperware to car parts -- and it's become one of our generation's greatest environmental concerns.

Now, Yale scientists say they may have a solution to the plastic problem.

PCWorld is reporting that the scientists found a fungus in the Amazonian rainforest, identified as Pestalotiopsis microspora - the first anyone has found that survives on a steady diet of polyurethane alone.

Amazingly, the fungus manages to do that in an anaerobic (oxygen-free) environment, conditions that are similar to the bottom of a landfill.

FastCoexist.com summed it up well: "Polyurethane seemed like it couldn't interact with the earth's normal processes of breaking down and recycling material. That's just because it hadn't met the right mushroom yet."

Yale student Pria Anand has been credited with recording the microbe’s remarkable behavior, and Jonathan Russell isolated the enzymes that allow the organism to degrade plastic as its food source.

The team published their findings in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology last year.

If scientists are able to harness the power of these little mushrooms, it could change the way we dispose of trash forever. http://www.abcactionnews.com/dpp/news/science_tech/break-it-down-fungus-eating-plastic-discovered-in-amazonian-rainforest

Truth


Friday, February 17, 2012

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Chromeo With Daryl Hall from Hall and Oats.

Quote of the day.

Physical happiness is not that hard to come by, but spiritual happiness is difficult to attain. Physical happiness is easy to see and know, but spiritual happiness is more elusive. Still, there are few people who accept these truths, because they believe that when the physical body is happy, the mind automatically becomes happy, too - and they are convinced that there is no other happiness to be found elsewhere.

Friday, February 10, 2012

Food for thought

The goal of this life is to reach the loftiest levels of what it means to be civilized, both in worldly terms and in Dhammic terms. Life, therefore, requires both worldly food and Dhammic food; if you partake of only one of these, then life is merely half full.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Top 5 regrets people make on their deathbed

1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.
2. I wish I didn’t work so hard.
3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.
4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.
http://www.ariseindiaforum.org/nurse-reveals-the-top-5-regrets-people-make-on-their-deathbed/    

Truth


Monday, February 6, 2012

Wise words from a wise man.


Take a course in good water and air; and in the eternal youth of Nature you may renew your own. Go quietly, alone; no harm will befall you.
John Muir

Wednesday, February 1, 2012